upworthy
Yes, the Bechdel Test. It’s named for Alison Bechdel, who is a comic book creator. The test is, are there two named women in the film? Do they talk to each other? And is it about something other than a man? I actually think the Bechdel Test is a little advanced for us sometimes. I have one called the Sexy Lamp Test, which is, if you can remove a female character from your plot and replace her with a sexy lamp and your story still works, you’re a hack.
upworthy
With the notion of marriage — an exclusive, emotional, binding ‘til death do you part’ tie — becoming more and more an exception to the rule given a rise in cohabitation and high rates of divorce, why should the federal government be telling adults who love one another that they cannot get married, simply because they happen to be gay? I believe when there are so many forces pulling our society apart, we need more commitment to marriage, not less.
Republican Senator Lisa Murkowski of Alaska officially announces her support for marriage equality. (via The Advocate)
effyeahnerdfighters

sharksareawesome:

I was walking to get pizza and a chasm opened up in the earth and I fell in and now I am at the bottom of this hole, screaming for help. And along comes you. Now, maybe you just keep walking, you know, there’s a strange guy screaming from the center of the earth, it’s perhaps best to ignore him. But let’s say that you don’t; let’s say that you stop. The sensible thing to do in this situation is to call down to me and say “I am going to look for a ladder, I will be right back!” but you don’t do that, instead you sit down at the edge of this abyss and then you push yourself forward and jump. And when you land at the bottom of the hole and you dust yourself off, I’m like “What the hell are you doing, now there are two of us in this hole!” and you look at me and say “Well, yeah, but now I am highly motivated to get you out.” 

This is what I love about novels - both reading them and writing them. They jump into the abyss, to be with you where you are. 

[…]

And I guess from the outside, it seems like, or it probably seems anyway that I jumped into the abyss with Esther. Right, like, here’s this author and he meets this reader of his and she’s a big fan and she’s sick with cancer, and so since he’s so awesome, he jumps down to be with her and he’s like “I’m with you to help you.” No. I wish, like, I wish I were that heroic. But where I’m standing, the true story is that Esther jumped into the abyss with me, because I was the one who was angry and hopeless and saw no meaning in life as it truly exists, and Esther came to me and said “You know, I’m not psyched about having cancer, and I don’t like being in pain all the time, and this is not by any stretch of the imagination an easy life, and I don’t wanna pretend that I’m excited about this, BUT, I like being alive, I am grateful to have loved and to have been loved. I have had a good life.” And that realization, that even though Esther’s life was a short life, it was still a good and rich and full life, that realization was central to The Fault in Our Stars.

John Green, An Evening of Awesome at Carnegie Hall

upworthy
upworthy:

What Homophobes Are Afraid Of: Apart from being one of the funniest people in the world, Ellen DeGeneres is a champion for gay rights. She wonders why people are afraid of being influenced towards homosexuality when clearly homosexual people aren’t influenced into heterosexuality. Ya don’t make any damn sense, homophobes. Image courtesy of LGBT News.

upworthy:

What Homophobes Are Afraid Of: Apart from being one of the funniest people in the world, Ellen DeGeneres is a champion for gay rights. She wonders why people are afraid of being influenced towards homosexuality when clearly homosexual people aren’t influenced into heterosexuality. Ya don’t make any damn sense, homophobes. Image courtesy of LGBT News.